Sun Kissed Days

Sun Kissed Days

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Tell Him


Talk to your son,
my child.
The way I spoke to you on 
moonless nights
about the stars and galaxies.
Tell him your tale:
how you loved cars,
how you simulated their sounds.
Tell him about colorful Lego bricks
you made into castles with soliders,
about war and peace.
Tell your son
about the stories you devoured
of art and history,
how your home was filled with love,
and every breath was brimmed with gratitude.
Tell him about your ancestors
and their will to survive the
strife and hunger of the grey war.
Tell him about bees and pollination,
the salmon's migration,
grizzly bears,
and bald eagles.
Tell him of your struggles
and your human decency. 
Talk to your son,
my child.
He will grow with sparkling pride.
He will know your love is undeniable,
your love shining through his days and nights.

51 comments:

  1. Beautiful, Ayala. I feel in this poem your urge to tell your own son some important things -- the importance of talking, really talking -- the importance to telling, really telling. There is so much to relay to a young child whose mind is waiting to hear.

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  2. (first off:handsome lad) What a beautiful sentiment. Passing those precious moments to your precious moment.

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  3. Share your thoughts and stories as they are a part of you and create a bond.

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  4. Yes, to create moments of beauty, love and pride from the very beginning....beautiful.

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  5. Oh my GOODNESS! What a WONDERFUL poem this is. How this grandson is making your heart and your poetry soar! My absolute favourite of your poems, Ayala! I love watching his little face, in the photos, as he grows ever more aware of his world. And seeing it through his eyes will bring you incomparable joy.

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    1. Thank you, Sherry. I appreciate it.

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  6. Oh Ayala, what a beautiful wish for both your son and your grandson. Just wonderful!!

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  7. Good advice for fathers, ayala. Reminds me a bit of two old rock songs, Cat Steven's "I want to grow up like you, Dad," and "Teach your children well" by Crosby, Stills, and Nash.
    ..

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  8. Good advice for fathers, ayala. Reminds me a bit of two old rock songs, Cat Steven's "I want to grow up like you, Dad," and "Teach your children well" by Crosby, Stills, and Nash.
    ..

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  9. Great advice and full of passion - what a little cutie too!

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  10. Creating that bond from the get go is sure the way to be, as true talking comes to be.

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  11. Yes!!! What a lovely poem...and "love shining through it all."

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  12. What a fabulous poem....we have lost the art and skill of conversation... of talking with our loved ones and sharing our history and story....it is what makes our humanity better.

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  13. Important advice. These stories define us and create the belonging and love in a family.

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  14. So touching--it gave me the chills. You are the quintessential mother, Ayala.

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  15. Beautiful, Ayala. Advice that resonates. xo

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  16. Oh this makes me cry a bit Ayala--beautiful and filled with wisdom!

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  17. Beautiful poem. Excellent advice to your son as well. Oh those memories of talking and growing. Lovely. Cute baby as well!

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  18. He is precious, smiles ~ Love your share Ayala ~

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  19. There can never be a better way to rekindle the love. Talking with one's kids is a neglected pastime. What with social media to occupy their time!

    Hank

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  20. It is good to tell our children our stories.

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  21. The mother in me relates to this completely. Very nice.

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  22. Story telling and passing it forward to the next generation is a very important tradition and art form. The significance shines through.

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  23. This write highlights the kind of education that molds a child into a rounded, value-oriented individual. It is less likely to come from a formal institution. It is inevitable that children who benefit from this kind of education, forge enduring friendships with their parent(s) or guardian. Sound advice!

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