Sun Kissed Days

Sun Kissed Days

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Invisbile Heroes




Heat rises from the streets,
sounds heard ,
a cell phone in a distance,
an ambulance siren,
all in the shadows of the white,
pristine stadium along Biscayne Bay.
Million dollar condos,
larger than life portraits,
of the basketball home team,
home town heroes.
The avenue glowing like
a pregnant woman in
her glory.
A walk away ,
the other avenue dying a slow death.
Smell of urine and semen rising
from the street.
Unattractive reality of brothers
living on cardboard boxes
in the street.
Those that drive by afraid to
look into their eyes.
Brothers that once bled
red, white, and blue
in unforgiving foreign green fields.
Long before America
led parades for heroes.
Long before small children
waved their flags in welcome.
In those days,
they were neglected,
set aside,
disposed of.
Their parades canceled and revoked.
Real heroes with no larger than life portraits.

I wrote this for the Anniversary Poetry Contest that was submitted to Nain Rougue. Please meet us here http://dversepoets.com where we share our thoughts and our hearts.

64 comments:

  1. Indeed there are so many invisible heroes who are 'visible' on the streets if one looks. I like the way you wove this poem...starting with the grandiose and ending up with those who are living in the streets. We all can see them IF we look.

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    1. Thank you, Mary. It's a sad reality ...

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  2. Yeah so many are in the shadows of sorts, but then needing no recognition makes them that much more of a hero.

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  3. it often exists so close together these two worlds...reminded me of a top notch french movie where these two worlds meet...and learn from each other...haven't seen it myself yet but heard lots of good stories.. in case you're interested... the intouchables... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olhg1suvE60

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    1. Thank you, Claudia. I watched the clip and I intend to watch the movie..it looks great.

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  4. smiles....hey i read this...there are many a hero that go unnoticed...i think it is sad in many ways how we handle our heros....far to many end up broken.....

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    1. Yes..you did :) so many end up broken...true.

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  5. Sad to say that so many of the 'overly' celebrated end up with lives just as broken as the under appreciated. I read this and think....we need to do better. I. I need to do better - to look where others may not, or where I might be less comfortable, and lend a hand. Or a heart.

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    1. Great thoughts, Adrienne. so glad it resonated with you.

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  6. How many people ever see the "other avenue"? And you're right--they came home not to parades but to indifference, even indignation. So sad. Really powerful stuff, ayala, and I love your images. Thank you.

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    1. Thank you, ds. Those were different times...and I just wonder what would have been different if people embraced them then...

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  7. It's so sad that there is such a divide...and so many people are prejudice against the poor...it's so wrong. Well written, Ayala

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    1. Thank you, Louise. It is always sad..the divide in society.

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  8. So sad, Ayala, and so unfortunately accurate. The line about the avenue being a pregnant woman swelling in abundance and life contrasts so strongly with the rest. Thanks for sharing this tonight.

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    1. Thank you, Joy. I appreciate your thoughts here.

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  9. Very sad. What we do to our real heroes and who we make into heroes because they can act/sing/ or play a sports game well. The contrast between the streets being life, a pregnant woman with everything good to look forward to and the homeless heroes is so vivid, very sad, but so well written.

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  10. A great piece Ayla, it's terrible that some are forgotten and disregarded despite laying their lives on the line for their country. Very sad, and so true.

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  11. I know of that city...I lived in Miami for a few years. Yes, the contrast of wealth and opulence to those forgotten and disregarded people is very sad. I feel like those who have served our country should be treated with the best we can offer. It's a disgrace that some are living the way they are. Well done, Ayala...a passionate statement you have made here.

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    1. Thank you, Gayle. so much to consider when you think of all they have given us.

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  12. such a sad, beautiful, poignant piece... those last lines are heartbreaking.
    those invisible heroes are everywhere, if only we could open our eyes to see.

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  13. I like the contrast of lifestyle from the beginning against those living in the streets ~ Sad to see this happening ~

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  14. I guess we are a nation that is comfortable living with these contrasts, so stark and powerful. Celebrities have taken the place of true heroes in the public eye. Unfortunate in the extreme.

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  15. This is such a study in contrasts--and I am with Grace--sad to see this---just an excellent write

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    1. Thank you, Audrey. I appreciate it.

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  16. Your metaphors and juxtapositions work so well together to make a rending point. It is too easy to discard people, shockingly easy in our society. The central issue of marginalization hits close to my heart. Excellent!

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  17. Powerful contrast in this thought-provoking poem.

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  18. beautiful work as always!! intense write..

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  19. It is indeed tragic that many of those who pledged their lives for the nation are marginalized by the very system that their sacrifices preserved.

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  20. This one seems a little of a departure for you..but a thoughtful capture on heroes, and how America treats and mistreats. I like much the juxtaposition of the two avenues..really a brilliant write, A. Thank you for sharing this.

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    1. Thank you, Jackie. This is actually a subject I am very passionate about.

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  21. Did not know you live in Miami.

    ANYWAY, just to say, I never avoid the eyes of Peeps, no matter their condition. It is the only way I can 'know' them, him, her, stranger, friend, drugged, drunk, or clean, sober. I want to SEE who is there, behind those 'windows'.

    Likely as not, there lives inside a hero, either of a war, or of the battle of a life skewed. Shame on me. Shame on us.
    PEACE, Ayala!

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    1. Good for you, Steve. I think you heart is open. Peace and Love to you.

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  22. Powerful words Ayala. Well said.

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  23. really nice use of the senses here, paints a great scene. Love the observations, great imagery throughout. Thanks

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    1. Thank you, Fred. I appreciate it.

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  24. some heart rending thoughts here...

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  25. We revered them only at their moments of glory. We forget fast and they became nameless. If only we look more deeply we would unwittingly miss them. Truly said ayala.

    Hank

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    1. Thank you, Hank.So much sacrifice...

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  26. Extremes are always hard for me in relation to the haves and have-nots. It seems so unfair sometimes, and the helplessness of it all is hard to handle. It can break your heart. Well done :)

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    1. Thank you, Lori. It does break my heart.

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  27. a brutal picture you paint, to be sure. strong piece.

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  28. vietnam vets? i still feel bad for the way many were treated, when they came home. (my 5th grade teacher had a son in vietnam - we wrote to him. he came back safely, and was received gladly into our small community, but so many weren't.)

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  29. This life, our society, kind of spredd in su societies... controvertial contradictory unbearable and so common...

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  30. Its great to see that people are sharing quite profitable information with each other and now we can move our selves to a new era.

    Beautiful,delicate,enigmatic

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  31. this tugs at my heart strings. the public hated that war and unfortunately, didn't support our troops because of it. wish it could have separated the two. Love these "colorful" lines: Brothers that once bled
    red, white, and blue
    in unforgiving foreign green fields.

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    1. Devastating that the two could not be separated. I wonder what could have been if they were. Thank you, Sheila.

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  32. I love the contrasts/comparisons in this very palpable poem. I love this line in particular,
    "The avenue glowing like a pregnant woman in her glory."

    One of my favorites from you Ayala.

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    1. Thank you, Rudri. One of my favorites too. A subject I am passionate about.

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